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Easter cards

The custom of sending Easter cards started around the turn of the last century, at the same time as picture postcards and Christmas cards were very popular.  The Easter bunny was a recurrent motif on the earliest Easter cards, which were often printed in Germany.  Later, when Easter cards started to be printed in Sweden, the Easter bunny soon disappeared as a motif.

Although Easter is a Christian holiday, more secular pictures have taken the place of religious motifs.  The foremost symbols of Easter - eggs, chickens, hen and cockerel - frequently appear as motifs on Easter cards.

From the folklore comes the witch or Easter crone on her way to the Witches Sabbath at Blåkulla on Maundy Thursday.  The Easter twigs with coloured feathers are part of the tradition of Good Friday birching.  The person who got up first in the morning, was to beat the rest of the family with birch twigs, to remind them of Christ’s suffering.

 

Hen and cockerel

Chickens

Other animals than hens

Children

Easter witches

Women

Couples

Men

Odd cards






Easter crone









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